Tuesday, 1 October 2013

A little rust and a lot of art

I've been out into the country briefly and come home laden with wonderfully rusty old tools and implements, and a couple of nice old (very old) boxes. On the right is a wonderful old two-man saw with very interesting teeth. It really is very easy to make me happy!
I'm spending about five days a fortnight at Suzy Spoon's Vegetarian Butcher, mostly helping in the kitchen where the hot orders are cooked, or in the preparation kitchen where the sausages, burger patties and schnitzels are made. Long days, but very enjoyable. I'm not tied to the kitchen sink (whew!) so I'm free to wander around Newtown, one of the most interesting shopping areas in Sydney. Very alternative and I love it.

On one of my excursions I took myself to Carriageworks, within walking distance of Suzy's shop. This was the venue for Sydney Contemporary 13, Sydney's new international art fair. Carriageworks (once part of the railyards of Sydney) is massive and in the four hours I was at the fair I think I probably saw about one third of the exhibition. I have way too many photos, many I can't identify, but I'll show you some of my favourites that I have found names for. I have long been very interested in New Zealand art and was pleased to find a range of favourite NZ artists. This is a detail from Bill Hammond's Midnight in the Mountains series.
This is one of Max Gimblett's quatrefoil series, a lush and luminous work. Max is one of my art heroes, from way back. A lovely man.
Not a Kiwi but at this exhibition presented by Auckland's Gow Langford Gallery, Damien Hirst's butterflies were stunning and unsettling. One painting is made up of real butterflies - wings and bodies - and as with much of Hirst's work, has caused distress to animal lovers. I think this is a painting, one of four on display and they were glorious but I couldn't help making sure I got as much reflection from the factory-like windows as possible. Perhaps a Damien Hirst butterfly making a gettaway?
This hanging installation by Lyndi Sales is titled Vesica Piscus, huge radiant perspex discs catching the light. This was just one of many works by Lindi Sales and I loved her precision, particularly in cut paper works.
Difficult to photograph, and one of a group of architectural forms by Daniel Agdag, these beautifully intricate girders are made of cardboard, cut with a scalpel and placed in hand blown glass domes. This one is titled The Decline, 2013, and measures 58.5 x 30.5 cm.
Chang'An Avenue detail 2013. One of 12 street lights by Liu Zhuoquan, which replicate streetlamps found along Beijing's Avenue of Eternal Peace. The crows are painted inside each glass shade of the lamps, painted with meticulous detail. The 12 lamps, dimly lit, were extremely beautiful.
For sheer sumptuousness, the contemporary folded screens of Maio Motoko could not be bettered. Using the traditional double hinge, and an amazing array of surface materials, these screens are completely stunning. I spent so long just looking, and still looking, that it's not surprising I didn't get right around the rest of the exhibition. There was so much to see here for a book binder, just getting my head around the hinging was a delight. Definitely one of my favourites.
Another favourite, and another that I spent a long time examining. Almost impossible to get a decent photograph as they were badly displayed on a desk full of gallery bits and pieces. This is a set of metal forms by Peter Zappa. If I could have afforded them I would have bought them in a heartbeat. However, sadly, they were way out of my price range...
Last, but certainly not least, is one of the few traditional Aboriginal artworks on display, though those that were there were wonderful. This painting is attributed to Jack Karedada, untitled (Wandjina) c. 1971. Earth pigments on Eucalyptus bark, 145.5 x 67 cm. Courtesy of the artist.
Mo Crow has a lovely post about this same exhibition here. Do have a look. Mo has links to many other interesting artists I haven't mentioned here.

Sorry I'm only managing one post a month. I have plenty I want to say but actually getting to sit at my desktop is becoming more and more difficult. Thanks for sticking with me, I do love to get your comments.

12 comments:

  1. Oh. And oh again. I was looking in wonder and then I got to the crow lamps and was lost. And filled with lust. Thank you.
    I dislike Sydney - but this is tempting. Very tempting.

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    1. EC, there was much to love in this exhibition; I hope you manage to get to it some time. Those crows were just gorgeous!

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  2. What a feast of gorgeous stuff!!

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    1. Mig, a real feast! So much to see and of course, so little time. I'm looking forward to the next one, which I think will be in two years.

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  3. rust AND contemporary art ..... how delicious!

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    1. Oh Ronnie, how right you are! I'm steeping myself in rust, becoming a rusty old woman. Contemporary art - I love it. Still enjoy traditional but find contemporary fills me with inspiration and joy.

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  4. Well, well: welcome home for a few days! ;-) I am so envious of your new rusty saw! Thank you for introducing me to Lyndi Sales! Fantastic work!! I also enjoyed seeing the Beijing Street Lights and Maio Motoko's folded screens.
    xxoo

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    1. Judy, thanks for the welcome home which I'm enjoying at the moment. (Home, that is, though I'm a bit sorry that I'm not at the Newtown Food Festival with Suzy. However, it is incredibly hot today so I'm probably lucky to be home in a darkened house.)
      So pleased you enjoyed some of my favourite things at the exhibition. xxooxx

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  5. oh good to have a look in retrospect through your eyes Carol, it was an incredibly inspiring show but very intense, happy to hear it's planned to be a biennial event!

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    1. Mo, it was intense, wasn't it? But certainly worth the effort on such a hot day. I'm trying to fit in as much art as I can now that I have a base in the inner west.

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  6. C - I think your previous post said it all - you seem to never home. Though if you get to collect good rusty bits then the journey has a purpose and great outcome. No that you are home you just have to get cracking with the creativity. Go well. B

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  7. B, I'm surrounded by the makings, I think my mind is full of inspiration, but when I'm home I'm so tired from being away, it seems like a bit of a squirrel wheel I'm on, and not much creativity happens.

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