Saturday, 22 February 2014

Be careful what you wish for...

My Secret Garden was seriously in shade, surrounded by overhanging branches. I had a plan, just to thin out the worst of them, loosening up the canopy, keeping the ambience and the Secrecy, but perhaps just giving me a wider selection of plantings. Seemed simple enough... So along comes the charming tree expert who takes one look, says the branches can be thinned - BUT my beloved, precious, magnificent, ancient jacaranda is seriously dangerous and must come down! Sure, it was leaning at a 40 degree angle, hanging over the fence and almost onto the road, branches were dropping frequently, and there was a massive crack along the main trunk but it was an interesting shape and magnificent when in bloom.


My first response was to argue of course, then I considered sobbing and jumping up and down on the spot but I could see that wouldn't go down well. My 8 year old grand daughter was as shocked as I, but we eventually decided to behave like adults and gave our permission. It was a dreadful day, very hot and humid, and I had to keep Peggy the Jack Russell indoors all day because she was delirious with excitement and in danger of getting squished. I couldn't watch the demolition so when the loppers finally left Peggy and I went out to find the garden transformed.


Top left, the jacaranda stump and agapanthus; top right, a 1 metre lilly now bent sideways; bottom left, my small azalea bed and ground covers almost destroyed by branches being pulled across it; bottom right, a pile of logs I still need to move.

The first impression is that the garden is now enormous. The jacaranda took up so much space lying across the garden that suddenly the big (surviving) beds of hydrangeas and azaleas seem suddenly diminished. The jacaranda has been cut off at about a metre, hopefully so that there will be regrowth that will flower. Fingers crossed!

Looking on the bright side, which I invariably do as I'm a born Pollyanna, I now have masses more room to garden! WooHoo! And now the branches have been thinned out I think my little garden/window house may be closer. All my collected windows are lined up along the fence just waiting to become a work of art. In the mean time, about 1000 bulbs will arrive in March so I'll be a busy gardener. Can't wait!


Always a welcome visitor in my garden is the native Triangle Slug. I hope it survived the lopping mayhem. The birds seem to be still around and one thing I now have room for will be more native plants to encourage more birds.

On a completely different topic, I'm going to Brisbane to Adele Outeridge's Studio West End to attend a four day workshop with Keith Lo Bue. I've wanted to do his Precious Little: Poetics of the Found-Object. This is at the end of March and I'm pretty darned excited, not only to see Keith again but to see Adele and Wim, as it is nearly 10 years since I was last there.

I'm posting this on my iPad so no links to anything. Remember I love to hear from you.

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Location:Wamberal NSW

13 comments:

  1. Oh, good god, I often think tree specialist aren't really tree specialists but tree-haters. I had a few of these incidents in the 17 years in this house. Couldn't they have left a bit more so it looks like a tree might come back?? Oh, gee... I hope you have a good time at your workshop, while I shall miss a tree I've never seen.

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    1. Meg, I like that you will miss my tree. I'm hoping it will come back. The tree lopper is sure it will, and Mo, in her comment says the same, and Mo is a real gardener. I live in hope...

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    2. I hope Mo is right. My garden guy said I could chop feijoa as much as I like and it will come back, and so we did in 1998-ish and the branches and leaves sure bounce back but the fruits? NO!!!!!!

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  2. As sad as it is to see such a large tree go - I for myself always like such changes: It is like a new beginning for your garden. So many possibilities. And I think I can hear some of this excitement in your writing, too.
    Have fun at your workshop! I am looking forward to hearing how it went and what you've learned, and what you made.

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    1. Hilke, you are right! The more I look at the garden, and I must admit, I'm doing a lot of looking and thinking rather than acting, the more potential I can see. It is exciting, to have this large space offering itself to my imagination.

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  3. I hear you. And I wince in rueful recognition. Our vile summer has killed a crab apple tree which I loved with a passion. A tree which bloomed so spectacularly that a neighbour used to hold tea parties when it was in bloom to share the joy with his friends.
    It has to come out. It will give me more room for other things. And still I grieve.
    Have a wonderful time at the workshop. And tell us about it please.

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  4. oooo I hate having to take down big beloved trees --- one by one I've had to take out all the ancient loquats around my house.... and now I have a thumping huge photinia that is threatening garden beds and the highway - one huge section split off and landed on top of our boundary fence a few months ago.... its days are numbered (such a shame)

    but on the bright side..... new garden bits to plan....

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  5. what's your favourite small tree &or large shrub that you never had room for before? Here's the chance to put one in! You probably know this but the old jacaranda will probably send up lots of vertical new growth, best to pick one stem to encourage into a new trunk and cut the others off. 1000 bulbs will be beautiful! Love the idea of a window house & look forward to seeing what comes out of your workshop with Keith

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  6. Yes, I feel your pain. But so much room for new things! Like, oh I don't know...maybe some H.mutabilis.I'll be pruning some of them this week.

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  7. such a big change! but with 1000 bulbs to arrive, the space will fill up quickly...
    somehow blogger keeps kicking off your blog feed...so then I forgot...until you comment and it reminds me to visit!

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  8. Green with envy at the idea of having a jacaranda in the garden, and I hope yours flowers again. If not perhaps you can buy another.

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  9. C - always sad to see a favourite old tree go - but sounds like it has made way for new life etc. Hope you enjoyed KLB and A and W. Pity you couldn't make up up to the mountain. Enjoy. Go well. B

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  10. Thank you to all those who replied that I didn't get to answer. No wifi and my iPad doesn't like me commenting! Not easy but I do appreciate you all.

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After several months of managing a flood of idiotic anonymous comments I am reluctantly returning to Word Verification. I will also leave Comment Moderation on. Such a shame but apparently robots rule. Remember, I love to get YOUR comments.